Early reviews, pt. 2

A couple more reviews to check out.

Maureen Ryan at the Chicago Tribune gives her review, along with an interview with Michael Taylor:

Though there is a chance — a very small chance — that “Virtuality” could spring back to life at Fox, other possibilities for the show have been explored, notably a new home on Sci Fi or a partnership deal with DirecTV. But so far, those journeys of network exploration have come to naught (and Taylor was unaware of any concrete plans for a DVD release).

Yet it’s hard not to imagine that if HBO, AMC or FX were to do a space story, this is the kind of sophisticated, thoughtful and quietly irreverent show they’d commission.

Script PhD also has their review up:

The most attractive aspect of Virtuality is how hip, modern and current it feels. With sleek, bright sets, fast-paced camera action from director Pete Berg, and gorgeous computer generated imaging of outer space and the virtual reality scenes, the show departs visually from the austerity that is often a sci-fi staple. It is also a shrewd, tongue-in-cheek satire about our obsession with “celebrity” against the backdrop of an all too plausible environmental reality here on Earth. The action aboard the Phaeton is being broadcast back on Earth as the most popular reality show of all time, “The Edge of Never,” being seen by billions every week. Orchestrated by Dr. Roger Fallon (James D’Arcy), whose simultaneous roles as reality show producer and on-board psychologist come into conflict, the show combines the drama of Earth’s impending doom and the search for other habitable planets with our modern televised voyeurism. Hosted by the well-meaning but invasive Billie Kashmiri (Kerry Bishé), the show meticulously follows every facet of the crew’s quotidian existence, complete with ubiquitous cameras throughout the ship, Big Brother-style confessional rooms, and manufactured conflict to entertain the masses. Combining Star Trek and The Hills, Virtuality adds yet another layer to the confounding question of what is real, what is virtual, and where the twain shall meet. All of this action and philosophy culminates in a shocking surprise twist that you will never see coming. It will test the sense of trust and camaraderie aboard the vessel, raise questions about the boundaries of escapism in a virtual world, and put in danger the crew’s psychological capacity for their ten-year mission in outer space.

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